Nett Sales senior telemarketer job – Dec 2015

We have an immediate requirement for a senior telemarketer to work with Nett Sales LLP, in our premises South East of Swindon (close to M4 Junction 15). Initial training and most of the work will be held at Nett Sales. Once set up we are happy to accommodate flexible working and allow the successful candidate to work in their own offices/at home one day per week.

This will be a fantastic role for the right person. This is a flexible, permanent requirement for one or two individuals to work between 12 and 30 hours per week – mornings, afternoons or both (agreed in advance) in telemarketing and telephone sales support.

The calls that will be made will follow up warm leads for Nett Sales and selected clients. You will be leading our telephone team and calling as a researcher or customer service person to start conversation and assess interest amongst people who have just engaged with white papers and articles. The caller will require a conversational style, rather than following a sales script. The ability to quickly establish rapport on the phone and talk knowledgeably about a subject, based on a conversation plan, is vital.

More info:

The work will be predominantly telephone based but the successful candidate will become involved in most parts of the Nett Sales business. Opportunities for extended hours will be available from time to time for the fight person.

Nett Sales: A leading edge, digital media, sales and telemarketing business. The work is traditionally only offered by big City agencies. But now down in rural Wiltshire! You will be helping to research companies and start conversation with known contacts to generate sales opportunities for clients using email, telephone, web & social media.

Key skills:

• Successful calls will be where a conversation has taken place and the contact has been qualified into one of a number of defined categories
• A genuine interest in sales, lead generation and customer relationship is important
• You must be able to think for yourself and contribute to the debate on getting more sales and winning opportunities
• Must be able to communicate verbally, in writing and be efficient in typing
• Interpersonal skills important – the ability to chat to business people
• Confidence on the phone
• Confidence to express opinions
• Ability to ‘mirror people’; talk with them the way they talk with you
• Can work unsupervised
• ‘Can do’ attitude
• Good knowledge around IT, technology and business use of IT is helpful be not essential
• Interested in people and their views
• Experience in a customer facing, telephone sales, account management or telemarketing role is essential, but full training will be given

A member of staff who chooses to work from home (1 day per week max.) will require home PC with Windows 7 or 8, MS Office 10, home/office broadband and WIFI. In order to help you be as effective as possible we train in advance, make test calls with you, track the calling efforts, record all calls and give you regular feedback. For the right person and for exceptional work, small top up bonuses are available.

Duties will include:

• Making conversational, telephone follow up and sales calls to follow up knowledge led emails sales or web registrations, to an engaged contact list
• Taking a basic telephone brief in order to ‘test call’ contacts, report back and put a telephone conversation plan together for the rest of your team
• Leading an experienced telephone and sales team in a senior, experienced telephone sales role
• Tracking, motivating and providing feedback to the telephone team
• Involvement in the client briefing and setting up the campaign
• Client liaison
• Updating client data and telephone activity in a CRM system
• Various web research
• Handling new customer enquiries and questions
• Handling feedback, product updates, offers and additional training from the above parties
• Working with team to run sales campaigns
• Compiling and checking weekly telephone reports
• Collaborating on hints and tips, opinion, advice and knowledge share articles to engage new and existing clients

Located in Aldbourne, 6 miles from Swindon on the 46 & 48 bus route from Swindon & Marlborough. And with staff parking available
Friendly and relaxed office. Can fit hours around bus times and a contribution towards travel is possible.

All calls will be made within normal UK business hours but within reason you can select mornings or afternoons with us in advance. Salary rates are between £10 and £14 per hour rate. Wage quoted is approx. and will depend upon experience. Payment will be based on hours worked and telephone performance levels achieved.

Previous sales, customer service, call centre, account management or telemarketing experience is essential. If you are interested and believe you have what it takes to give this a try, please submit your application and CV.

Nett Sales will be holding a New Year, January afternoon open day for regional candidates, entitled ‘No Trust Bye!’ This will help interested individuals to:

  •  explore career opportunities in telemarketing and telephone research
  •  understand the key skills behind a conversational telephone approach
  •  see real examples of telephone conversation starting, but short on scripts and big on conversation
  •  discuss the role of trust in sales and customer service
  •  learn how to be interesting and interested in customer views, opinions and feedback

And if you like what you see, get the opportunity to hone and show your skills with us and our clients.

If you want to book your place on the Open Day, to apply for the position, or have questions please call Carl Wheatley or Simon West on 01672 505050 or email carl@nett-sales.com.

The Maths of data

Darts_in_a_dartboardOften when we are planning an email campaign for a client, one of the biggest questions we face is “how many records are needed to achieve the results expected?”

Whilst we are firmly of the opinion that you can never have too many contacts to engage with, there are practical limits, especially if you are purchasing records or gathering them by telephone research.  So here is our rule of thumb for email campaigns:

  • Starting at the end and working backwards…
  • Campaign outcome: Require 4 good leads per month
  • Therefore need 20 interested contacts (1 in 5 can be classified as a lead)
  • Need to call 200 contacts following up the email campaign (one in 10 being interested) so we need to generate 200 interested contacts with the email campaign
  • Anything from 5% to 0.1% of contacts will engage with a good email campaign depending on the data used, message and market sector.

For well targeted, researched and opted in data you can achieve 1.5% engagement, for cold, purchased data, the figure is probably closer to 0.4%.  This means that if you want 4 good leads per month, you need:

For Good, warm contacts: 13,300 records and for cold but well targeted purchased data: 50,000 records.

The good news is that if you are willing to invest in your campaign and allow interest to build over a few months and be very rigorous with re-engaging the contacts that were “maybe”, you can reduce your data requirements by half, but this is still a lot of data to acquire, manage  and engage with…

Nett Sales is recruiting!

Part time Telemarketer

We have an immediate requirement for one or more telemarketers / researchers to work for Nett Sales LLP at our office in the beautiful village of Aldbourne, south east of Swindon on the Marlborough Downs (close to M4 Junction 15).

This will be a fantastic role for the right person. This is a half-time ongoing requirement (4 hours per day) for telemarketing and telephone sales support for a major client in the training market.

You will be making calls to follow up interested businesses.  This is NOT cold calling!  You will require a conversational style, rather than following a sales script. The ability to quickly establish rapport on the phone and talk knowledgeably about a subject based on a brief is vital.

Initial training and most of the work will be done at Nett Sales but there is the opportunity to work from your own office / home part of the time.

Key skills

  • A genuine interest in sales, lead generation and customer relationship is important
  • You must be able to think for yourself and contribute to the debate on getting more sales and winning opportunities
  • Must be able to communicate verbally, in writing and be efficient in typing
  • Interpersonal skills important – the ability to chat to business people
  • Confidence on the phone
  • Can work unsupervised
  • ‘Can do’ attitude
  • Good knowledge around IT, technology and business use of IT is helpful be not essential
  • Interested in people and their views
  • Experience in a customer facing, telephone sales or telemarketing role preferred but full training will be given

The Job

This position is for an ongoing ‘half time’ (4 hours per day) member of staff to join our telephone team. The successful applicant will be able to work flexibly and choose their hours within reason.

Any work undertaken outside Nett Sales office will require Windows PC with good Broadband.  We will provide a VoIP phone for making calls. In order to help you be as effective as possible we record all calls and give you regular feedback.

Duties will include:

  • Making conversational, telephone follow up and sales calls to follow up knowledge led emails sales or web registrations, to an engaged contact list
  • Updating client data and telephone activity in a CRM system and / or spreadsheets
  • Various web research
  • Process email replies
  • Handle new customer enquiries and questions
  • Handling feedback, product updates, offers and additional training from the above parties
  • Weekly and monthly sales admin and reporting into Excel spreadsheets
  • Working with the team to run sales campaigns

Location:

Located in Aldbourne, 6 miles from Swindon on the 46 & 48 bus route from Swindon & Marlborough in a friendly and relaxed office. Parking is available.

Hours:

All calls will be made within normal UK business hours but within reason you can select mornings or afternoons with us in advance. Salary rate is approx £10 per hour rate. Wage quoted is approx and will depend upon experience. Payment will be based on hours worked and telephone performance levels achieved.

If you are interested, please call Carl Wheatley on 01672 505050, email carl@nett-sales.com or visit www.nett-sales.com.

 

How to use your credibility to be a great speaker

email selling is deadLove them or hate them, presentations are a large part of a salesperson’s life.  They can vary from a quick 5 minute impromptu talk for one person to a structured talk to many hundreds of delegates at a major exhibition.

All presentations hinge on the speaker’s ability to hold their audience’s attention.  There are many reasons why an audience may be listening to a speaker so the speaker needs to understand why the audience is listening to them.

For example, if people have paid to attend a motivational seminar, the speaker is likely to have a very receptive audience to start with.  How receptive the audience is after they started is down to the speaker!  If a manager has bullied a sales team into attending a product presentation, the speaker is less likely to start with a receptive audience.  Again it is down to the speaker whether the audience will stay dis-interested or will start to sit up and respond to the presentation.

Step number one in preparing your presentation is to consider the audience. You must establish credibility in the eyes of your audience.  Remember: beauty is in the eye of the beholder!  For your presentation to succeed you need your audience to believe that you have the knowledge, authority and right to talk on the subject.  This task can vary depending upon the audience.  If you are talking to three people who know and respect you already, your credibility is beyond question.  If you are presenting to an audience that does not know you, you will need to build credibility.  Here are some of the factors you can use to build credibility with your audience:

Display your credentials

  1. 1.       Nothing establishes competence better than credentials.  You don’t have to be a Nobel Prize winner, but any Degrees, certificates and licences you hold that are relevant to your audience add weight to your character.
  2. 2.       If you have any honours or awards, even something ten years ago for being the best hamburger salesman can be relevant to a group of salespeople!  Has your community, or charity honoured you?  All of these seemingly small points help to build your credibility with your audience.
  3. 3.       Have you ever been published?  Even an article five years ago in a trade journal carries weight.  There is still something about the printed and published word that impresses people.
  4. 4.       What experience do you have?  Presumably you are working in the industry about which you are presenting.  Experience is important – it implies competence.

So how do you inform your audience about your impressive credentials?  It is a bit unseemly to stand up and launch into a ten minute commercial for yourself and how great you are!  The best way is to let the person introducing you handle the bulk of the chore.  Prepare a written briefing for them to read.  If this is not possible as you are not being introduced, you will need to introduce the relevant points into your presentation.  Don’t force them, use them as logical supports for your points.

Associate yourself with high-credibility organisations

Can you claim membership of a credible organisation or, failing that, link yourself to one?

Admit failings

You can build credibility by admitting past mistakes or shortcomings.  Doing so will help you be perceived as honest.

Display similar values

People have a natural tendency to believe those who hold similar values, beliefs and attitudes and to distrust those who don’t.  If you have similar values to your audience let them know early in your presentation.

Lead by example

Are you recommending a particular course of action?  If so, it will lend credibility to your presentation if you can show that you have already followed your own advice.  Any time you can reference an action that supports what you’ll be saying – do it.

Find testimonials

It is far more convincing for someone else to sing your praises.  Get quotes from satisfied customers and industry figures held in high regard.  Get the person introducing you to work some of these into their introduction and use some yourself in your presentation.

Now that you have prepared to build your credibility to an all-time high with your audience all you have to do is to deliver your presentation and sit down!

The best Time Management tip… ever!

IMG_3310_lgThere must have been more books written about time management than any other area of business.  I personally know of over 30 and they all miss the point!

Traditionally time management has helped you to manage your time to fit in the maximum activities with the minimum wasted space.  Unfortunately most systems do not distinguish between important, urgent, not important and not urgent so you end up doing more but not doing the things that need doing the most.

Steven Covey tells a story of how in one of his seminars he asks some delegates onto the stage and presents them with a large jar and some big stones.  He asks them to get the maximum they can into the jar.  Once they have put as many of the large stones into the jar as possible he asks them how to get more into the jar.  They say they can get no more in.  He then presents them with some smaller stones that they can fit in around the big ones.  After they have fitted as many of these in as possible he asks them the same question.  Someone suggests filling the cracks with sand so they do this.  The jar is now completely full and they are confident that they cannot fit in any more until he presents them with a jar of water!

The point of the story is that if they had started with the water, sand and small stones then they would not have accommodated the big stones in the jar.  The same is true when managing your time.  Identify the “big stones” and then fit in the other bits around them.  In order to identify your “big stones”, perform the following exercise:

Print this out and fill out on the six blank lines below your six most important things that you need to do today:

  1. ___________________________________________
  2. ___________________________________________
  3. ___________________________________________
  4. ___________________________________________
  5. ___________________________________________
  6. ___________________________________________

Start off doing number one until it is finished or you can do no more then move on to number two, then number three and so on.  The reasoning behind this is that these are the six most important things that you must do today.  If you do not do them this way, then you were not going to do them any other way and at the very least you have made a start on the most important things in your life.

This idea comes from a young business analyst who was asked by the boss of a large American steel company to help him improve his efficiency.  The young man asked the steel boss to perform exactly this exercise.  The steel boss was so impressed with the results that he told all of his managers and soon the whole company was using the technique with dramatic results!

The young man suggested that the steel boss simply send him a cheque in a few months for whatever he felt the idea was worth.  The young man received a cheque for $25,000!!

Review your six most important actions above and try this technique for a week – it really does work.

12 Steps to Outstanding Sales Conversations

IMG_1108You may have hundreds of conversations each week, some long, some short, some business related, some personal. But not all conversations are equal and your sales conversations are probably the most crucial to get right.

Therefore by turning your attention to these conversations and improving their content, you will get more sales. Big claim, I know, but read on and humour me for a minute…

The basic rules are as follows:

  1. Think of a chess clock.  This is two clocks in one.  Only one of which is running at any one time.  When one player has made his move, he presses the button on his side.  This stops his clock and starts his opponents.  When his opponent has finished his move, he presses the button on his side.  This stops his clock and re-starts the first player’s clock.If you view your conversations in this way, giving your “opponent” a chance to talk then when she has finished, she will give you the chance to talk.  Apply the “two ears to one mouth” rule so that if they “overrun”, you can gently interrupt with a closed question (one that required only a one word answer) and then start talking.

    Shining the light on the other person in this way will help her to open up and give far more information than you would have received otherwise.

  2. Maintain eye contact.  If you keep looking at the other person while he is talking, not only will you pick up all of the non-verbal signals he is giving off (unintentionally), but you will also reassure him that you are paying attention and listening.
  3.  Make notes.  I am not blessed with a photographic memory and unless you are, you need to make notes.  This also re-assures the other person that what she is saying is so important to you that you want to write it down!
  4. Don’t finish others sentences.  This ranks as number one most annoying habit with many people.  Tempting as it may be, let him finish – you may be surprised!  This point is particularly important when listening to someone with a stutter.  Let him finish on his own.  He will be extremely grateful and you will build great rapport, as most people automatically finish his sentences for him!
  5. Don’t jump to conclusions.  This goes hand in hand with finishing others sentences.  Give them time to finish and elaborate.  They may well reveal more information than you were expecting.
  6. Do respond.  There is nothing worse than talking to a person who sits with a blank face not saying or doing anything.  We all need the verbal and non-verbal responses to reassure us that we are being listened to and appreciated!  Nodding, smiling, “hmm” and leaning forward in our seat are all reassuring gestures to keep the other person talking.
  7. Watch you speech habits.  The moment you meet someone, they are judging you.  By the time you have spoken a dozen words they will have decided in which “box” you belong.  People will judge you as much by how you say something as by what you say.  If you have a weak ineffectual style then no matter how positive and upbeat your words, you will be judged weak and ineffective.  Watch how you judge other people!
  8. Use Questions.  Questions are great!  You can use them for clarification, to show interest, to voice objection, to show support and many other uses.
  9. Watch body language.  Be aware that your body language speaks far louder that your voice.  If there is a conflict between what you are saying and how you feel about it (maybe you are uncomfortable giving the information) any astute observer will spot the conflict and probably either ask highly penetrating questions or dismiss the information she is receiving.  Where there is a choice, people tend to accept the non-verbal communication (body language, posture, etc.) as accurate and the verbal as false.
  10. Ask “Why?”.  In many situations, this simple three letter word can extract more information than any other approach.  The simple act of asking “Why?” after someone has made a statement and then sitting quietly, leaning forward slightly in your seat, pen poised, will cause most people to gush forth with information.  When repeated (“Yes buy why?”) it can be even more revealing.  It also demonstrates that you are interested in what the speaker is saying.
  11. Take a pause.  There are two good uses of a well-placed pause in conversation.  The first is when the speaker has finished.  If you pause and look as if you expect him to continue, he may well do so and give you more information.  A variation of this is to pause and if he does not continue say simply “..and?”.  This may prompt further where the pause on its own did not.The second use of a pause is when answering a question.  Just before you answer a question pause and take a small breath.  This does two things: first, it gives you a chance to think before replying; and second, it shows that you are considering the question carefully.  This will add weight to your answer in the other persons eyes.
  12. Remember what she said.  If you are able to demonstrate your complete recall of previous conversations with a person, they will be impressed.  Active listening helps you to remember, making notes will also aid your memory.  A useful technique that you can use is to repeat back to yourself everything that the other person says.  As she is talking simply repeat the words to yourself (don’t move your lips!).  You will find that this helps your concentration as well as improving your memory as you are hearing everything twice.During your conversation ask questions about topics that you discussed previously.  She will be impressed that you remembered and you will be able to build rapport.

I have found that jotting down keywords in meetings and then writing up the meeting notes afterwards is the best way of ensuring complete recall.  Review your notes before the next meeting and pick on a few points to raise at this meeting.

How to spot a liar

SONY DSCIt is very important to know when a person is being economical with the truth, or just plain lying in any business situation.  To the skilled observer the majority of people can be quickly detected when not telling the truth (I exclude politicians from this as they make a career from avoiding uttering the truth!).

People signify their discomfort with what they are saying through combinations of body language gestures and eye movements.  We are looking for the combination.  Never take one movement in isolation – the person may have a nervous twitch!

Typical body language movements that would indicate discomfort with the spoken message include:

Pulling at the corner of his eye, his ear or his collar.  All of these gestures show major discomfort.  Watch you actions next time you spot a Police car in your mirror when driving.  If you have any reason to feel guilty your free hand will be pulling the bottom of your ear down.  Incidentally, the Police have been trained to look for this gesture – it is so common!

Remember that it is the feeling guilty that generates the reaction, not actual guilt.  This is important when interpreting body language.  If you are dealing with a nervous person and you ask her a direct question that she feels nervous about answering, even if she tells the absolute truth she is still going to exhibit some of these signs, as she is nervous.  It is the combination of changes this is important.

Blushing.  Many people cannot help blushing when they lie.  It may be subtle, but is often noticeable.

Foot Tapping.  This is often a sign of lying, almost as if the person is saying “get on with it, I’m not comfortable with this.”

Movement stops.  When a person is normally animated in their speech, using lots of arm movements and being expressive with his face, he can go very still when not telling the truth.  This is almost as if he fears that movement or expression will give the untruth away.

Eyes shut.  It is a sure sign of lying when someone shuts their eyes as they talk.  The person is worried that you will see the lie in their eyes and so shuts them.

Erratic breathing and flat voice.  Both of these signs come from a person trying to control their body to not give away their discomfort with their words.

Licking/touching lips or mouth.  If you have ever seen a young child tell an untruth, you will often see him put his whole hand over his mouth.  Touching the lips or mouth is an “adult” version of this gesture.  Most people would recognise licking lips as a nervous gesture that can indicate lying if used in conjunction with other gestures.

The eyes.  It has been said that the eyes are the only visible part of the brain.  They can certainly provide you with much information about the thoughts inside a persons head!

Generally, when a person is retrieving past memories, she will look to your left as you face her (she left them there) and if she is in the process of creating new information, she will look to your right.  If you ask here a question to which she should already know the answer (eg, “when is your birthday?”) she should look to the left as you face her to retrieve the information.  If she looks to the right it is an indication that she is creating the information, and in this case as she would already know her birthday, is likely to not be telling the truth.

This incredibly powerful technique can tell you a lot about what the person you are talking to is thinking about.  One word of warning, some left handed people have switched over the functions of the two sides of the brain so they will react opposite to how I have described here.  As long as you know the person, you should with practise be able to almost read their thoughts.

An interesting exercise now that you know what to look for is to watch interviews on television and see how the interviewee’s eyes move with each question – it can be very enlightening!

In summary…  This list of indications of lying should help you to identify those people who routinely avoid telling you the truth and those who only do so occasionally.  This information is extremely useful to you professionally.  A word of warning.  It is unlikely to help your case to blurt out “Liar!!” when a person lies to you.  This will simply entrench him in his position and he will become overtly hostile to you as you have shown him up.  Far better to file the information away for use next time you have to deal with that person.

How free images could cost your business a fortune…

011_004We wanted to tell you the great news that Getty Images has recently announced; “Getty Images is making over 35 million photos available for FREE!” Read the BBC announcement here.

However, there are some limitations about when you can and cannot use one of Getty’s “free” images. PCWorld says “Use of Getty’s photos online must be for non-commercial use”. Follow this link to read the full story.

So what does non-commercial use mean?
Does this include your blog or website?
When are we allowed to use a free photo from Getty Images without receiving a nasty letter threatening legal action for inappropriate use?

We decided to look into this further. As a specialist sales company with our own blog writing and maintaining article libraries, news areas and blog for our clients, we do not want to risk reputation damage or put our necks on the line.

We have done some further research so you don’t have to. And it seems this is a rather grey area… We asked for some independent legal advice and this is what we were told about this issue.

“You are best advised to engage a copyright lawyer, but they will give you a yes and a no answer”… So this still leaves you and us in the dark and even more confused about using photos that are claimed to be free.

We delved deeper into this and decided to go straight to Getty Images for an answer:

“You may only use embedded Getty Images for editorial purposes (meaning relating to events that are newsworthy or of public interest). Getty Images may not be used for any commercial purpose (for example, in advertising, promotions or merchandising) or to suggest endorsement or sponsorship; in violation of any stated restriction; in a defamatory, pornographic or otherwise unlawful manner; or outside of the context of the Embedded Viewer.”

From what we researched we would give anyone that wants to use a photo for their blog, website or other commercial uses the following advice:

  1. Refer to the Creative Commons licences. If you want to give people the right to share, use, and even build upon a work you’ve created, you should consider publishing it under a Creative Commons license. You can choose to allow only non-commercial uses and protect the people who use your work, so they don’t have to worry about copyright infringement, as long as they abide by the conditions you have specified.
  2. When searching for photos, try using Google’s advanced search. This option enables you to search for images that are available to use, share and even modify for commercial use.  To do this select ‘advanced search’ then in the ‘usage rights’ drop down select the best option that suits you.
  3. Seek out other good places to find free high quality photos to use for your website, blog & other commercial uses. 4 to get you started are: Pixabay, Unrestricted Stock, Hubspot and Unsplash.

But beware that you need to read the terms of these sites carefully especially when using these images for commercial use. We do not think sites like these always have proper clearances from, say, the model in the photo for you to use their image for your business.

This is what one site says “Pixabay cannot be held responsible for any copyright violations, and cannot guarantee the legality of the Images stored in its system. If you want to make sure, always contact the photographers. You use the site and the photos at your own risk!”

B2B Buyer Behaviour: how to convert more quality leads

Derek Singleton - Software AdviceDerek Singleton of Software Advice has recently written a report on B2B buyer behaviour by in which a study found 3 key findings:

  1. Call leads fast- really fast
  2. Tuesday- Thursday is the best time to reach buyers
  3. Don’t underestimate the opportunity around the holidays

The findings show that calling prospects straight away can significantly improve your ability to qualify leads generated from a campaign. Also, there are certain times of the year, week and day when you need to plan your in-house sales team’s capacity to maximize your ability to turn click-throughs into leads.

The report suggests that if you call a lead within 5 seconds, the odds of qualifying them are 29% higher than if we call within 5 minutes.

Derek Singleton says “Our report shows that when a buyer contacts us directly for information—requesting a price quote or product demo, for instance—there is a significant benefit to calling that buyer right away. “It was amazing to see that if we call a buyer within 5 seconds of converting, we qualify that buyer at a rate 30 percent higher than our average qualification rate.”

At Nett Sales we think this research is definitely valid. We aim to follow up a message as quickly as possible by tracking who has clicked and opened the message. We follow up with a call to find out what prospects thought and how relevant it is to their needs.

The research also highlights leads that come in Tuesday through to Thursday qualify at twice the average qualification rate for other business days.

This makes sense and is something that we at Nett Sales already endeavour to follow. Calling prospects on a Monday or Friday is not as successful as the rest of the week, as these are day’s people of most likely to have off and be away from the office.

The week before Christmas is surprisingly active for conversion and qualification rates.

This may come as a surprise to some businesses, as you may think that in the run up Christmas and other holidays, businesses are starting to wind down and are not thinking about B2B buying. But during Christmas and New Year many companies and looking to allocate their budget and have the time to read emails and research online.

Derek Singleton gives some valuable advice by saying “Of course, it’s also important to understand that not every buyer deserves a call right away. If a buyer contacts you indirectly—by completing a form to download a whitepaper, access video content, or view other gated material—then you should consider nurturing, rather than calling, the lead. As sales and marketing professionals continue to compete for the attention of B2B buyers on the Web, understanding their online behaviour will be critical to success. Hopefully our data helps provide a fresh perspective for online B2B buyer behaviour.”

If you would like to read the report in full for more details, follow this link. 2013 Online B2B Buyer Behaviour Report. If you would like to learn more about what Nett Sales does and how these principles from the report can help you gain more sales more quickly contact our team on 01672 50 50 50.

Is the customer really in charge?

customerRobert Craven is soon to release a new version of his best-selling book “Customer is King” introduced by Sir Richard Branson. We have taken a fresh look at this book and put into practice Robert’s advice to help us and our clients.

Robert’s advice has made a big difference to our business as well as our clients’, so much so we have been blogging the results as we go.

What Robert says

The modern business’s secret, is that the customer runs the show. And the biggest secret today is that ‘the customer is in charge’. The other secret is that it’s harder to deliver good customer service than ever before, as customers are more demanding.

The reason that businesses were and still are so excited about the web is the belief that ‘the customer is in charge’ It would appear that the consumer, at a retail level or commercial level is taking charge. This is the power of the internet and its associated technologies.

Clearly, most customers do not feel ‘in charge’. You can use this to your advantage. Think how easy it can become to stand out from the rest when you really do put the customer in charge. Customers have been told that they should be in charge and yet they rarely, if ever, feel as though they are in charge. So see what happens if you put them in charge.

Applying this to Nett Sales

Nett Sales helps its clients get more customers. We work closely with our clients to create compelling campaigns using a blend of email and telephone work to ensure we pass our clients well qualified leads that they can turn into customers.

Robert’s advice has helped us to recognise that our customers like to be in charge and make their own decisions. This has prompted us to be very transparent with our messages and allow readers to click on the links that interest them.

For us the early stage of every campaign is very important. One of the steps that we have recently introduced is an outline schedule at the beginning of a campaign explaining how things are set up and will work. Once the campaign is up and running we arrange quarterly reviews and monthly telephone catch ups to meet customer expectations and keep everything on track. If you would like to learn more about how a typical schedule works, follow this link.

We have worked with each of our clients to recognise the features and the associated benefits for their products/ service which we have used in telephone follow-up calls. This has helped up pass more hot leads to our clients.

Are you looking to do something a bit different with your marketing? Want more sales and to engage more customers? Contact us on 01672 50 50 50 for a friendly chat and to discuss your requirements.