Email Marketing is dead – Long live email selling!

A recent LinkedIn discussion on the merits of email marketing showed the massive polarity of responses.  On one side was heard:

  • I hate spam.  I never read any email from anyone I don’t know
  • It doesn’t work – I’ve tried and failed
  • Email is dead anyway, numbers using email are declining.  Social Media is the way forward
  • No one read our marketing emails that we’ve spent a fortune having designed

And on the other hand comments like these appeared:

  • Email is a great channel to find new customers
  • We mainly use email to retain clients
  • Our email strategy gives the highest ROI of any of our marketing

So what’s going on?  How can a relatively homogenous group have such different views on the effectiveness of email as a promotions and sales channel?

I believe the difference is between those that see email as a broadcast medium and those that seek to engage contacts by sharing knowledge and advice.  To differentiate the two, I have coined the phrase email selling to describe this second activity.

The difference is stark:

Email Marketing Email Selling
Designed emails with lots of HTML and pictures Plain emails, often short with limited or no design
Content talks about the sender “we’re great”, “we’ve got lots of clients”, “look at our services”, etc… The content is focussed on the recipient:  Useful knowledge; valuable advice and relevant stories
Everyone gets the same message Recipients are segmented and receive different messages and customised content intended to be directly relevant to them.
Messages often originate from the marketing department Messages are usually created with the involvement of sales department or other line of business users
Focus is on propagating brand and being “on message” Focus is on giving great value to the recipients
Fire & forget Regular engagement with further email or telephone follow up around the topic the recipient engaged with
Campaigns don’t evolve based on user behaviour New messages are created and targeted based on engagement with past content
ROI difficult to measure Known ROI based on a regular stream of new leads and closed sales

 

So next time you are thinking about your email strategy think email selling over email marketing.

4 Things ALL Articles Must Have

The importance of articles in today’s websites and internet based companies is immeasurable. Good articles get great traffic to your site. It is important in making a site work and earn a profit. You must have the good sense to include articles on the site that will work for you and earn the many benefits articles can give to your site.

Articles drive traffic to a website and are a factor in giving site high rankings in search result pages. The higher a site ranks the bigger slice of the traffic flow pie you get. With a large increase in traffic flow, there are more profits and more potential for other income generating schemes as well.

Articles have certain requirements as well. These requirements must be met to obtain the maximum benefits. A well written article will catch the interest of your customers and keep them coming back for more. They would also be able to recommend your site to others.

Here are some tips to help you in making your articles. Below you will read about four things all articles must have to make it a successful, profit earning and traffic overflowing site:

  1. Keywords and Keyword Phrases.

    An article must always include keywords and keyword phrases. As each visitor goes to the site, some just browse however, some are looking for a specific something; these usually use the search engine and type in the keywords they are looking for.

    The Important thing is that you have articles on your site have the keywords included. For example, if you have a site selling car parts, you must have articles about cars and their parts. There are many tools on the internet that help a webmaster in determining what keywords and keyword phrases are most sought after, you can use this tool to find which keywords to use.

  2. Keyword Density

    You must use your key words fully. An article must have good keyword density for a search engine to recognise its presence. Articles should at least have ten to fifteen per cent of keyword density in their content for search engines to rank a site high in their search results. Getting a high rank is important for a site.

    Keyword density is the number of times a keyword or keyword phrase is used on an article. The number varies depending on the number of words used in an article. An effective article must have a keyword density that is not too high or too low. A very high density may mean the article is lost and may turn off a reader as well as the search engines. It comes off as overeager. A low number may be ignored.

  3. Good Article Content

    They must be regarded as good reading material. Articles must be able to entertain people as well as provide good information. Articles should be written well with correct spelling and good grammar. If you want people to trust you, make your work good and well thought out.

    People respond well to figures, facts and statistics. Try to get great information and as many facts as you can. A good and well written article will boost your reputation as an expert in your chosen field or topic. As more people believe in you. They will be able to trust you and your products.

  4. Linking Articles

    If you are going to submit articles to ezines and/or contribute your articles to newsletters and other sites, DON’T forget to include a link to your site. A little resource box with a brief description of your site and you should always be placed right after your articles that you have submitted. If people like your articles, they will most likely click on the link directing them to your site.

How to Create an Outline for Your Entire Article

Some people would rather walk on piping hot coals than write articles. What sets some people apart from others towards article writing is that they are prepared and have some methods and procedures.

One of the methods you can use to prepare yourself is to create an outline first, so you have an idea of what to do first and plan for your succeeding steps. Being prepared makes the job easier and faster.

An outline can act as the design or blueprint for your article. This will guide you in creating the introduction, body and conclusion of your article. Here in this point, you can write down some of the ideas and sentences that will look good in your article. This could be some of the focal point that could help make your article creative, interesting and appealing to a reader.

A carefully planned and fully prepared project would guarantee and ensure a problem and worry free procedure that can virtually go without any hassles. Creating an outline for all your articles will get you ready to breeze through writing an article in no time at all. Here I will provide you with some tips and guidelines in how to create an outline for all of your articles.

Do a couple of brainstorms and jot down your ideas first. Think of some ways to attract the interest of your reader. Designate a time frame where you can write down all the ideas. By this time you should have done all your research, familiarised yourself with your topic and reviewed and reread your ideas and notes.

The next step is to discover your sub topic and sub titles. As you would provide a first sentence for your article, one that would immediately grab the attention of your reader, you would need some as well for your sub topics. To be concise, you would need to get all the facts that will support and go against your point.

These are the frames or skeleton of your article, now it’s time to add the flesh and the meat of your article. You will need to connect all your paragraphs and sub topics. This will form the body of your article. While the introduction will usher in the ideas of your paragraph, you will need a conclusion that will wrap up your points.

The outline for your article would also require you to write a draft first. This may take more than one attempt but remember that it is called a draft for a reason. Your outline shall be perfected as each draft is written and this draft is meant for your eyes only so there’s no reason to feel ashamed. As you go on, you will clearly see the bigger picture and write an article that will perfectly suit what is demanded of it.

Reread and reread what you have written down. Always refer to your outline so that you won’t drift away from what you had first written down. It’s not hard to be caught in the moment and get lost in your writing frenzy. Your outline will help you keep on track. All those hours spent in outlining your article will not go to waste. This will serve as your guide in writing articles. Trust and rely on your outline because this will prove to be a very helpful tool in writing all of your articles.

Email marketing stats: consumers open just 20% of messages

See on Scoop.itEmail selling for client acquisition and retention

Email marketing is an important customer acquisition and retention tool, but as consumers get bombarded with more and more email messages, how do you know whether your campaign should be judged a success?

See on econsultancy.com

Use Email To Give Your Social Content Traction

See on Scoop.itEmail selling for client acquisition and retention

According to an article in Mashable, the average person spends 15.5 minutes on Facebook every single day.

 

But even with these great numbers, what are the odds that your communication will appear in someone’s social news feed at the exact time that they are logged in to see it?

 

That is the challenge with social marketing. Many marketers feel like they’re speaking in a forest where no one is listening. A great way to help insure your content is read is to remind people of it with email.

 

With email, the message is directly received and persistent. People tend to spend their time scrolling through messages several times a day. While stats may vary based on the content and the offer, according to the Epsilon Q1 2011 Email Trends and Benchmark the average email open rate is 23.3% and the average click-through rate is a respectable 5.9%.

See on chiefmarketer.com

15% to 20% of email is opened on a mobile device. How are you dealing with this?

See on Scoop.itEmail selling for client acquisition and retention

With around 15% to 20% of email opened on a mobile device, marketers need to ensure that their email campaigns cater to this growing trend.

See on econsultancy.com

Dear [insert company name], personalised emails don’t impress customers

See on Scoop.itEmail selling for client acquisition and retention

Personalized email advertisements are far more likely to repel customers than to endear them, according to a study led by a Temple University Fox School of Business professor.

 

But the research – which drew from 10 million marketing emails sent to 600,000 customers – also shows there is a way companies can use personal information without driving customers away: send them deals on products they want…

See on www.fox.temple.edu

The 12 Pillars of Reader-Friendly Email Marketing

See on Scoop.itEmail selling for client acquisition and retention

This is a fantastic article from HubSpot that takes you through their “12 pillars” to produce great emails that will be read and responded to.

 

The only point I would disagree with them on is providing a view in browser link.  In all the email we have sent I have only seen one click on that link.

 

So, on the basis of only including what your readers want, I feel that this particular link should not feature in your emails. 

See on blog.hubspot.com

Mobile email: are the top brands getting it right?

See on Scoop.itEmail selling for client acquisition and retention

Mobile raises a number of challenges for email marketers.

 

They have to consider the usability for people who click on links within the email, the clarity for readers who are prioritising their messages, and the fact that you never truly know when a recipient will use mobile.

 

But it’s too big an opportunity to simply ignore it. Research shows that around 15% to 20% of email is opened on a mobile device, and 41% of European smartphone owners would either close or delete an email not optimised for mobile. 

See on econsultancy.com

Email and Social Media posts are mismatched to the recipients

See on Scoop.itEmail selling for client acquisition and retention

Did you know that the highest interaction on YouTube is on Mondays?  How many campaigns are sent on Monday?  None of ours!!  

 

And brand tweets are missing the mark big time.  84% released during working hours, when twitter engagement is at it’s highest early morning 5am to 8am… 

See on www.dma.org.uk