What do the next 2 years hold for email marketing?

crystal ballSo unless you’ve been trekking the arctic tundra for the past 6 months the chances are you’ve heard of the new laws on electronic communication and data protection. (Hint: they’re huge, their impact even more so…)

But the question everyone is asking is how much will these laws change everything we think we know about B2B and B2C marketing?

We’ve been scouting the web for answers, here are some of the most interesting predictions:

Trust will become crucial

“Concerns of government surveillance have filtered down into corporate surveillance. Digital citizens are increasingly questioning the motives of the tools that help us buy such as advertising, comparison services and loyalty programmes” Ryan Garner

When Edward Snowden leaked thousands of classified documents back in 2013, it illustrated that the amount of data that could be held on an individual was staggering, and it shattered the trust of millions.

The rejection of Safe Harbor and the data laws passed since are consequence of this wake up call.

What this means is that no individual is going to consent to the storing and use of their personal information without assurance and more importantly trust in that company.

So it looks like the focus is going to shift for the world of email marketing. It’s no longer going to be about sending emails to as many people as possible, most of whom you don’t know from Adam. It’s going to get personal: knowing those you contact, and tailoring your offerings to suit their needs. The only way to boost their marketing skills is with the help of these multi-channel marketing services.

Data quality not quantity

“Opt-in lists have always performed much higher than their opt-out counterparts for one defining factor. The open rate is higher, leading to greater figures in engagement, click through and conversion rates” – CommuniGator

We all know that warm data performs better than cold, and this opt-in data will be red hot. By default opt-in data will be up to date, and include contacts that want to hear from you, with a genuine interest in your offerings.  

CommuniGator for instance, have achieved click through rates of 37% on opted-in data, vs a click through rate of just 5% on cold data.

Although the size of your database will inevitably shrink, the quality of what remains will be far higher, meaning you’ll be able to spend more of your time nurturing the leads that matter most. 

Content overload

“Too often, content has not had the scaffold of data, insight and creativity to support it. We have jumped the gun getting personal without building the foundations” – Sarah Hooper

As Sarah Hooper points out “data intelligence and compelling content are vital ingredients in delivering a personalised experience in the customer journey” – something we’ve already established as being key.

This ties in strongly with the predictions of Graham Smith – whose blogs are a fantastic resource for everything related to GDPR and lead generation.

Smith suggests that though the best way to get opt-ins is by promoting valuable content, as more companies go down this route, more and more content will appear until it reaches “saturation point”.

He predicts that those who already deliver good content will see response rates fall, and new entrants to content marketing will be left unimpressed by the figures.

The best way to combat this is by producing unique content that will deliver real value to your prospects and give them good reason to opt-in to your campaigns and not your competitor’s.

The Canadian Scenario

Predictions are all well and good, but what about certainty? How can we know how this will affect us if no one’s done it before? Well back in 2010, the Canadian government started down the same road we are now travelling; consent and opt-ins are old news to our friends across the pond.

So what can we learn?

  1. Being prepared and starting early made a huge difference to opt-in rates
  2. Those that didn’t know / left it to the last minute struggled
  3. Opt in rates are typically between 12% and 20%, however, marketing results were equal or better than before the laws
  4. A strong, well optimised CRM was essential to log and prove consent

We’ve all got a lot more to learn from the Canadians; the insight they can offer us into this new and unfamiliar field will be unparalleled. We’re currently in talks with several companies to bring you the latest intel, tips and tricks to really up your opt-in rates. Watch this space.

In the meantime, check out the growing library of resources on the new laws here.

If you would like any help or advice on any of the above issues, or about the new laws in general, get in touch on 01672 505050 or drop an email to gdpr@nett-sales.com

Thanks and credit to the following for their great insight:
Skip Fidura, Chairman of the UK DMA Email Marketing Council
Prof. Christoph Bauer, CEO at ePrivacy GmbH
Andy Dickens, CEO Virtual Sales Ltd
Sarah Hooper, Amaze One
Graham Smith
Ryan Garner, Director of CitizenMe

 

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